House Mice

What are House Mice?

The house mouse is the most commonly encountered and economically important of the commensal rodents. House mice are of Central Asian origin, but they are distributed worldwide and can be found throughout Canada and the United States. House mice are not only a nuisance, but they can pose significant health and property threats.

House mice breed rapidly and can adapt quickly to changing conditions. In fact, a female house mouse can give birth to a half dozen babies every three weeks and can produce up to 35 young per year.

Identification

Pest Stats

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Colour

Dusty gray with a cream belly
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Size

2 1/2 – 3 3/4″ long
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Legs

4
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Antennae

No
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Shape

Round
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Region

Found throughout Canada

What do House Mice
look like?

House mice are typically dusty gray with cream-colored bellies. Fur color varies from light brown to dark gray depending on the mouse’s location. House mice have four legs and a round shaped body. Their muzzles are pointed, and their ears are large with some hair. House mice range from 2.5 to 3.75 inches long. Their tails are usually 2.75 to 4 inches long.

What do House Mice eat?

In nature, mice prefer to eat cereal and seeds, but they will also eat insects, nuts and fruits. Inside structures, mice will consume almost any human food, but prefer grain based products.

house-mouse
House Mice Infestation

There are a handful of ways to tell if house mice have made your home their own, including the following telltale signs of an infestation:

Gnaw marks: Gnaw marks may be either rough or smooth.

Droppings: House mouse droppings may be either soft and moist or dried and hard. The droppings measure about 1/8-1/4 inch long. They are rod shaped and pointed on the ends.

Tracks: House mice leave 4-toed prints with their front feet and 5-toed prints with their hind feet.

Rub marks: House mice often leave oily rub marks on walls along which they travel.

Burrows: House mice burrow using nesting materials such as insulation.

Runways: House mice usually use the same pathways. Active runways are sometimes visible, with rub marks, droppings, and footprints along them.

Odour: The odour of house mouse urine may become distinct if there is a large number of house mice in a particular area. House mice use their strong-smelling urine to communicate with one another.

Damaged goods: Mice prefer seeds or cereals but will readily eat insects trapped on glue boards.

Actual rodent: If you see a mouse scurrying across the kitchen floor, there is likely a family of mice hiding out of sight.

Getting Rid of House Mice

If you suspect a house mouse infestation, contact GreenLeaf Pest Control to conduct an inspection and recommend a proper course of treatment to get rid of house mice.

How to Keep House Mice Away from Your House

To keep mice and other rodents out, make sure all holes larger than a dime and gaps wider than a pencil are sealed with silicone-based caulk, steel wool, or other construction material. Keep areas clear and store boxes off the floor, as mice can hide in clutter. Store food in sealed glass or metal containers. Leave surfaces clear of crumbs and food morsels, which may attract house mice.

If you suspect a house mouse infestation, contact GreenLeaf Pest Control to conduct an inspection and recommend a proper course of treatment to get rid of house mice.

How to Keep House Mice Away from Your House

To keep mice and other rodents out, make sure all holes larger than a dime and gaps wider than a pencil are sealed with silicone-based caulk, steel wool, or other construction material. Keep areas clear and store boxes off the floor, as mice can hide in clutter. Store food in sealed glass or metal containers. Leave surfaces clear of crumbs and food morsels, which may attract house mice.

Simple Rodent Control Tips

Fortunately, there are many ways homeowners can proactively prevent and get rid of rodent infestations in their homes:

Install door sweeps on exterior doors and repair damaged screens.

Screen vents and openings to chimneys.

Seal cracks and holes on the outside of the home, including areas where utilities and pipes enter the home, using caulk, steel wool or a combination of both.

Store food in airtight containers and dispose of garbage regularly.

Keep attics, basements and crawl spaces well ventilated and dry.

Replace loose mortar and weather stripping around the basement foundation and windows.

Eliminate all moisture sites, including leaking pipes and clogged drains that provide the perfect breeding site for pests.

Inspect items such as boxes, grocery bags and other packages brought into the home.

Store firewood at least 20 feet away from the house and keep shrubbery trimmed and cut back from the house.

Fortunately, there are many ways homeowners can proactively prevent and get rid of rodent infestations in their homes:

Install door sweeps on exterior doors and repair damaged screens.

Screen vents and openings to chimneys.

Seal cracks and holes on the outside of the home, including areas where utilities and pipes enter the home, using caulk, steel wool or a combination of both.

Store food in airtight containers and dispose of garbage regularly.

Keep attics, basements and crawl spaces well ventilated and dry.

Replace loose mortar and weather stripping around the basement foundation and windows.

Eliminate all moisture sites, including leaking pipes and clogged drains that provide the perfect breeding site for pests.

Inspect items such as boxes, grocery bags and other packages brought into the home.

Store firewood at least 20 feet away from the house and keep shrubbery trimmed and cut back from the house.

Let us help you out.

Greenleaf Pest Control’s Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is an approach to eliminating your ant problem that respects the whole ecosystem – human and insect. IPM is a combination of eco-friendly methods to remove ants from your home, business, or property once and for all. Our methods ensure the removal of these pests without over-reliance on toxic chemicals that may be hazardous to people and their environment.

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