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Wildlife Removal’ Category

Wildlife Removal

Get Pests Out of Your Chimney in Time for Santa’s Arrival
Posted By: Daniel Mackie

Get Pests Out of Your Chimney in Time for Santa's Arrival

 

Wood-burning fireplaces are an excellent way to escape the blustery weather – after all, few things are more enticing than snuggling up with a cup of hot cocoa in front of a roaring log fire – but they also give pests a chance to find a way into your home.

 

Raccoons, squirrels, opossums, and other animals can occasionally enter homes through chimneys in search of a denning site, where they can keep warm during winter and raise their babies until spring. To some of them, your uncapped chimney is indistinguishable from a hollow tree, and they have no idea there’s a human dwelling at the other side of it. Unlike hollow trees, however, the inside of your chimney is often damp and slippery, and some animals will likely get stuck inside.

 

Having a wild animal inside your chimney can be anything from a nuisance to a safety hazard.

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What Pests Should You Expect to See Inside Your Home This Winter (And How to Recognize Them)
Posted By: Daniel Mackie

What Pests Should You Expect to See Inside Your Home This Winter

 

Across the country, cold weather and heavy snowfalls are not only forcing people indoors, but also driving rodents, ants, spiders, raccoons, and others to find food, water, and shelter inside the house. To homeowners, that spells trouble for more than one reason: aside from being a nuisance, indoor pests can endanger the structural integrity of the house, contaminate foodstuffs, and spread disease. Here are five critters you should expect to see inside your house this winter and some tips on how to recognize their presence.

 

1) Rodents

Could you think of anything grosser than sharing your Christmas dinner with the filthy, disease-carrying rats that can cause major property damage and put your family’s health at risk? As winter closes in, rodents will enter homes more often, usually squeezing through holes the size of a quarter or climbing up drain pipes. Aside from the minor damage they cause by gnawing on furnishings and building materials, exposure to their urine and droppings can transmit serious diseases such as salmonella, hantavirus, and infection.

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Wildlife Control: Backyard Damage Caused by Raccoons, Geese, and 3 Other Species
Posted By: Daniel Mackie

Toronto Wildlife Remove

 

Deer grazing in your backyard can be a most satisfying sight, unless they ravage your newly-planted tulips or treat your vegetables as an all-you-can-eat buffet. Raccoons may be cute and fluffy creatures always looking to play and cuddle, but they suddenly turn into an unwelcomed guest when they start rummaging through your trash cans at night. The same goes for chirping birds, shiny-eyed squirrels, and those adorable chipmunks always stuffing food into their mouths – they’re a welcome sight until they start ravaging your backyard, trampling your flowers, and even endangering your health. Below is a short description of the garden damage caused by five most common wildlife pest species in Canada:

 

Raccoons

 

Raccoons top the list of wildlife that wreak havoc in flower and vegetable gardens across North America. The second favorite occupation is rummaging through trash bins and cans or raiding bird feeders – all in search of food.

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This Summer, You’ll Be Sharing Your Yard with Flightless Geese
Posted By: Daniel Mackie

Canadian Geese

If you’ve been seeing a lot more feathers and feces in your back yard or local park, you’re not alone. During a period of a few weeks in late June and early July, Canadian geese go through a molting process, when they become flightless as they wait for their new feathers to grow in. Although the honking and excessive feathers may irritate many Canadian landowners and homeowners, you’re advised to be patient for just a few more weeks, when they will regain their flight capabilities and will likely move on.

 

If some Canadians still find it in their hearts to enjoy the sight of geese bathing or taking their goslings out for a walk, most people view them as problematic. A few decades ago, Canadian geese were only seen during the spring and fall migration, and almost never during summer, as they rarely nested. But according to the U.S.

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